Stop Creditors From Calling

Knowing how to stop creditors calling is important for many people. Debt creditors can be intrusive, disrespectful and unabashedly aggressive. While unpaid debts must eventually be resolved, excessive calling can border on harassment. Luckily, a few strategies exist for stopping the calls.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act
In 1977, Congress passed the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. This act keeps debt collectors from calling at inconvenient times or bothering you at work. However, not all debt collectors get the memo. Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you can tell creditors to stop calling either verbally or in writing. While the latter method is officially requested, the former may also be sufficient.

Using the FDCPA to Verbally Order that Calling Stops
Because the FDCPA requires creditors to stop calling when they are told to do so, many creditors quickly back off after verbal instruction. Next time an unwanted creditor call comes, tell the creditor to stop calling. In many cases, the creditor will agree out of necessity. If the calls continue, it may be necessary to order calls to stop via letter.

Using the FDCPA to Order that Calling Stops Via Letter
Officially, the FDCPA insists that an instruction to creditors be in writing. While verbal instructions often suffice, persistent creditors may also be stopped with a letter. To do this, send a certified letter to the creditor, and request a receipt. If the calls do not cease after the letter is sent, the creditors are legally liable. Furthermore, the federal law is on your side.

The Importance of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act
Bad creditors harass debtors and their families, and they may exaggerate what can happen to a debtor in order to collect. You don't have to face these types of creditor calls alone. Use the FDCPA to your advantage, and instruct the creditors to stop calling verbally or via letter. Without the distraction of bad creditors, you can focus on finding a way to pay down your debt.

Related Life123 Articles

Need to know how to write a hardship letter? If you are in a tough position, tell your creditors about it. While there are no guarantees that they will renegotiate your debt, a hardship letter might help.

Is negotiating credit card debt yourself a good idea? If you have a good grasp of hard numbers, such as your interest rates and your monthly payments, you may be able to negotiate.

Frequently Asked Questions on Ask.com
More Related Life123 Articles

Can a creditor seize a bank account? Knowing the answer can help you prepare your finances and work out a payment plan before your creditors take any drastic steps.

Knowing how to write a credit dispute letter can help you remove any errors that appear on your credit report as quickly as possible.

Is negotiating credit card debt yourself a good idea? If you have a good grasp of hard numbers, such as your interest rates and your monthly payments, you may be able to negotiate.

© 2014 Life123, Inc. All rights reserved. An IAC Company