Finding Old Muscle Cars

Collecting and restoring old muscle cars is a great hobby. It's also a very popular one, which can make locating these prized vehicles a challenge. Here are some tips on where to look.

Antique Rides
Some of the most popular muscle cars were built in the mid to late -60s and early -70s. Depending on your state's motor vehicle department's rules, a car is considered to be an antique once it reaches 25 or 30 years of age, thus making the muscle cars of the -60s and -70s antiques. With antique collectors now in the hunt, it is becoming more difficult to find a "project car," or a muscle car that needs to be restored.

Old muscle cars can still be found, however. Check the obvious places, such as classified ads and craigslist.org. Sometimes, you can find old muscle cars in the fields of middle and southern America. Many people have them just sitting in a field, rotting away. To find a muscle car that has been abandoned, you need to do a lot of driving along old country roads in the farming areas of Tennessee and Kentucky, among other states. If the cars are abandoned on public property, they're yours to haul away. If they're sitting in someone's field, chances are good that you'll be able to take them simply by talking to the owner of the land. Don't expect these cars to start, and plan to spend a lot of time and effort to get them street-worthy.

Buying Muscle Cars
You can also find old muscle cars that have been refurbished. Keep checking print and online classifieds, and watch for auctions and car shows in your area. Occasionally, you will find a project car that someone started and cannot finish, either because of health issues or financial issues.

Also, watch for swap meets in your area. Often, someone may have a project car for sale at a swap meet. Swap meets are great for finding discount new old stock (NOS) parts for your project car. One of the biggest swap meets is the Turkey Rod Run in Florida. It is a combination swap meet and car show, held at the Daytona International Speedway.

If you have the funds to purchase a finished project, there are many auctions across the United States for muscle cars. One of the biggest muscle car auctions is the Hemmings auction. You can find more information about Hemmings' auctions by searching for Hemmings Motor Auctions.

If you have a drag strip in your area, go to the races. Most drag strips allow patrons in the pits. Some racers have race cars and muscle cars for sale. You may be able to pick up a good deal on a project car at the track. 

Even if you don't see cars for sale at drag strips, swap meets or car shows, ask around. The people at these shows are plugged in to the local marketplace. Often they know of a project car or two in the area, and they'll be willing to point you in the right direction.

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