Treating a Mild Concussion

If you have had a concussion, even a mild concussion, you are not alone. According to the United States National Library of Medicine, over one million people in the United States get concussions every year. Of those concussions, many are far from serious.

The treatment for a mild concussion is quite simple: rest. Most doctors suggest resting in bed for about 24 hours after the concussion has been sustained. A doctor might ask someone to check in on the concussed individual during that time, however - a quick wake-up every two or three hours to ensure that the person is alert and not showing signs of more serious injury.

A bump to the head often causes an resulting headache, so acetaminophen is a good course of action to take. Avoid aspirin and other anti-inflammatory pain killers - anti-inflammatories can increase bleeding.

If you or your child is injured while participating in a sports activity, check with your physician to see how long you or your child should be sidelined. You have a higher risk of getting a more severe concussion if you play before you have recovered from the initial incident.

Keep in mind that a mild concussion can look worse than it really is. There is so much blood pumping into the head area that what would be a bruise on another part of your body will turn into a knot on your head. This is why superficial cuts to the scalp and the forehead bleed so much. This is not to say that you shouldn't take the bump seriously. Just realize the bump may be in the normal range for what it is, even if it doesn't necessarily seem it.

Symptoms of a concussion do not always show up right after the accident occurs. In addition, a seemingly mild accident can lead brain damage or even death if not recognized and treated right away. Therefore, even if you feel fine right after an accident, make sure that you have someone monitor you.

If the person who has the concussion becomes unconscious, his or her pupils dilate unequally or the person becomes incapable of walking, contact emergency personnel right away. These might be signs of a bleeding or swelling brain.

In fact, it is always wise to consult your doctor in the event of any head injury. In this case of concussions, the old saying that "it is better to be safe than sorry is completely true.

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