Myths About Ladybugs

Given their popularity, it's not surprising that there are many myths about ladybugs. In many parts of the world, the ladybug considered good luck. These beneficial garden insects eat harmful pests that can damage plants and produce.

Myths About Ladybugs In The Wild

  • When a bug is not a bug. The name of the ladybug perpetuates the biggest myth about these creatures-they're not really bugs at all! Technically, because ladybugs belong to the genetic order Coleoptera, they are considered beetles. In fact, the Entomological Society of America recognizes these insects by the name lady beetle.
  • Age spots. Although popular lore states that you can tell how old a ladybug is by the number of spots on its shell, these marking are actually determined by species. Once an adult ladybug gets its spots, they don't change during its lifetime.
  • Winter reproduction. Although some people think that ladybugs reproduce in the walls of homes during the winter, these bugs go into a dormant stage during cold weather and reproduce outdoors in the spring.

Myths About Ladybugs In Culture

  • Forget about the stork! In Switzerland, children are sometimes told that they are brought to their parents by a ladybug.
  • Good luck. In Britain, farmers expect bountiful crops when many ladybugs are sighted in spring. In many cultures, the ladybug is seen as a symbol of good luck. Some even say that if you hold a ladybug in your hand and make a wish, the direction that the ladybug flies off to is the direction where your good fortune will come from.
  • How romantic. In Belgium, it is believed that if a ladybug lands on a young woman's hand, she'll be married in a year. In Norway, there is a myth that if a man and a woman see a ladybug at the same time, they'll fall in love.
  • A gift from the Gods. In Norse legend, the ladybug came to earth riding a lightning bolt. And in some Asian cultures, it is believed that the ladybug is blessed by God and understands human language.
Related Life123 Articles

There are over 5,000 different types of ladybugs in the world with almost 500 of them found in North America. Some types of ladybugs are more common than others, however, and some of the most common have been imported from other countries.

What eats ladybugs? Whether you call them ladybugs, ladybirds (as in the United Kingdom) or the scientifically correct lady beetle, these insects are famous for eating aphids and other garden pests. 

Frequently Asked Questions on Ask.com
More Related Life123 Articles

What eats ladybugs? Whether you call them ladybugs, ladybirds (as in the United Kingdom) or the scientifically correct lady beetle, these insects are famous for eating aphids and other garden pests. 

Read articles about types of ladybugs, what eats ladybugs and myths about ladybugs.

Read articles about types of ladybugs, what eats ladybugs and myths about ladybugs.

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