Know the Types of Nut Trees

Many types of nut trees combine the beauty and shade of an ornamental tree with a tasty crop of edible nuts. Whether you're looking for a snack for you or the birds and squirrels, a nut tree is a great landscape choice.

Pecan Carya illinoensis
Size: 30 to 40 feet
Zones: 6 to 10
Soil Type: Deep, well drained soil.
Soil pH: 6.0 to 6.5
Sunlight: Full

Pecan trees "alternate bear" which means they will have a large crop one year and little or no crop the next.

English walnut Juglans Regia

Size: Over 40 feet
Zones: 4 to 8
Soil Type: Rich clay-loam.
Soil pH: 7.0+
Sunlight: Full

Walnut trees are valued as much for their wood as for the nuts they produce. Walnuts roots secrete a chemical that inhibits the growth of other plants. Plant your walnut tree away from other landscaping if possible.

Hazelnut/ Filbert Corylus avellana
Size: 12 to 15 feet
Zones: 4 to 8
Soil Type: Well drained, sandy loam.
Soil pH: 6.0 to 7.0
Sunlight: Full

Considered a shrub, these plants are known as Hazelnuts in the eastern US and Filberts in the western US.

Almond Prunus amygdalus
Size: 15 to 20 feet
Zones: 8 to 10
Soil Type: Deep, well drained soil. Heavy, poorly drained soil will lead to root rot.
Soil pH: 6.0 to 6.5
Sunlight: Full

Water deeply, but infrequently, as almonds need less water than most nut trees. Most almond species need two varieties for pollination.
Macadamia Macadamia integrifolia
Size: 15 to 20 feet
Zones: 9 to 11
Soil Type: Deep, well drained soil rich in organic matter.
Soil pH: 5.0 to 6.0
Sunlight: Full

A popular warm-climate landscaping tree, macadamia trees are drought tolerant once established.

Chestnut Castanea dentata
Size: 30 to 40 feet
Zones: 4 to 8
Soil Type: Well drained, sandy loam.
Soil pH: 5.5 to 6.5
Sunlight: Full

After harvesting chestnuts, the nuts should be placed in hot water (125 degrees) for one hour. Nuts that have been given a hot water bath can be kept in the refrigerator for up to two months.

Heartnut Juglans cordiformis
Size: 20 to 30 feet
Zones: 5 to 8
Soil Type: Rich, moist soil.
Soil pH: 6.0 to 7.0
Sunlight: Full

Also known as Japanese Chestnut. Heartnut trees produce a mild flavored nut that is easily extracted from the heart-shaped shell.

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