Do Medications Offer an OCD Cure

Although there is currently no OCD cure, there are many treatments that can provide some level of relief. Treatments vary, although most offer a combination of both a biomedical remedy and therapies that help the sufferer to cope with the condition.

Though some claim to have discovered OCD cures, little data has been produced to substantiate these claims. With no verifiable cure available, medication and therapy remain the OCD sufferer's best defense against the symptoms of this condition. A person who takes medication has greatly reduced levels of anxiety and is therefore able to deal more effectively with, and even resist, compulsive urges. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is also extremely effective, and is often used in conjunction with drugs to help ease tension and reduce OCD symptoms.

Treatments for OCD
There are several medications approved for use by OCD sufferers, but some have reported side effects related to their use. Medications used to combat OCD include Paxil, Prozac and Zoloft. Most who use drug therapy are said to experience immense improvement.

Cognitive therapy involves directly exposing the OCD sufferer to the objects of their obsession, while the drugs offer sedation to help maintain a calmed state. Johns Hopkins Medicine reports that cognitive-behavior therapy is so effective because, "...in the absence of a neutralizing ritual, this distress will eventually decrease to levels that are tolerable or vanish almost entirely. At this point the rituals will disappear because there is nothing left to escape from and they are no longer reinforced by reductions in anxiety." Medication and therapy may not be actual OCD cures, but they help people confront fears that may have been present since childhood.

Hypnosis is not an OCD cure, but it can induce a calming state that allows sufferers to manage their symptoms. Be selective choosing a hypnotic therapist and avoid those who claim to have developed a cure for the condition. Self-hypnosis is also a useful tool and is easily learned. If you are taking any medications, hypnosis is not recommended. Relaxation therapy can also be beneficial in conjunction with drug therapy.

The Search for an OCD Cure
Researchers continue to search for an OCD cure but, like many other disorders, there are many variables that make development of a cure difficult. Major depressive disorder is often present with OCD. In addition, many sufferers desperate for a temporary OCD cure resort to self-medication with alcohol. Alcohol is a known depressant, and although momentary relief may be felt, it only serves to aggravate the sufferer's depressive moods.

The search for an OCD cure is at the forefront of most sufferers' minds. They may be tempted to spend large sums of money on alleged OCD cures advertised online. It has already been proven that medication and behavioral therapy does work, so avoiding scams cures cannot be stressed enough. Although scientific advancements toward a cure are being made, claims of cures should be dismissed as optimistic babble or the false claims of snake-oil salesmen.

For those who are dissatisfied with current treatment options, it may be helpful to become a part of a research program. Education, behavioral therapy or approved OCD medications are provided as part of these programs.

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