Who Invented Cricket

The question of who invented cricket has long been a source for debate. In the past it was believed that cricket was invented in England hundreds of years ago. A reference in a 1598 court case over land in Guildford, England, was made to a cricket match in 1550. This was previously believed to have been the first official reference to the game of cricket.

Now, Australian Paul Campbell, who works at the Australian National University in Canberra, has found evidence that suggests that cricket may have begun even earlier. In Belgium. He claims to have found a poem from 1533 written by John Skelton that contains a reference to "crekettes," which Campbell takes to mean "cricket." "The Image of Ipocrisie" mentions Flemish immigrants in England and calls them "the kings of crekettes."

The poem also uses the word "wickettes," which is thought to translate to wickets, a part of the game.

To bolster Campbell's claim, Dr. Heiner Gillmesiter of the University of Bonn has introduced the possibility that the word cricket derives from the Flemish phrase "met de krik ketsen," or "to chase with a curved stick".

Though the evidence appears to be strong, the English are not certain that they're buying it. Cricket matches provide quite a rivalry between England and Australia, with each country competing for the "Ashes," a trophy. Some speculate that this discovery may have been timed to unnerve the English before the Ashes tour. 

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